X me no Xs Quotes

Sourced

  • But me no buts.
    o Henry Fielding, Rape upon Rape (1730), act ii, scene 2.

  • Cause me no causes.
    o Philip Massinger, A New Way to Pay Old Debts (1625), act i, scene 3.

  • Clerk me no clerks.
    o Sir Walter Scott, Ivanhoe (1819), chapter xx.

  • Diamond me no diamonds! prize me no prizes!
    o Alfred Tennyson, Idylls of the King (c. 1842-1885).

  • End me no ends.
    o Philip Massinger, A New Way to Pay Old Debts (1625), act v, scene 1.

  • Fool me no fools.
    o Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Last Days of Pompeii (1834), book iii, chapter vi.

  • Front me no fronts.
    o John Ford, The Lady’s Trial (1638), act ii, scene 1.

  • Gift me no Gifts; I have none for thee.
    o Theocritus, The Idylls (c. 3rd century BC), translated by James Henry Hallard (1901), p. 104. Use of this literary device was likely introduced by the translator; an earlier translation by C.S. Calvery has the same character, Amycus, responding to Polydeuces offer to “[v]isit our land, take gifts from us, and go” by saying “I seek naught from thee and can naught bestow”.

  • Grace me no grace, nor uncle me no uncle.
    o William Shakespeare, Richard II. (1595), act ii, scene 3.

  • Madam me no madam.
    o John Dryden, The Wild Gallant (1663), act ii, scene 2.

  • Map me no maps.
    o Henry Fielding, Rape upon Rape (1730), act i, scene 5.

  • Midas me no Midas.
    o John Dryden, The Wild Gallant (1663), act ii, scene 1.

  • O me no O’s.
    o Ben Jonson, The Case Is Altered (c. 1609), act v, scene 1.

  • Parish me no parishes.
    o George Peele, The Old Wives’ Tale (c. 1595).

  • Petition me no petitions.
    o Henry Fielding, Tom Thumb (1730), act i, scene 2.

  • Play me no plays.
    o Samuel Foote, The Knights (1748), act ii.

  • Plot me no plots.
    o Beaumont and Fletcher, The Knight of the Burning Pestle (1611), act ii, scene 5.

  • Thank me no thanks, nor proud me no prouds.
    o William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet (1597), act iii, scene 5.

  • Virgin me no virgins.
    o Philip Massinger, A New Way to Pay Old Debts (1625), act iii, scene 2.

  • Vow me no vows.
    o Beaumont and Fletcher, Wit Without Money (1614), act iv, scene 4.

    Lyrics

  • Matchmaker, matchmaker, plan me no plans.
    I’m in no rush. maybe I’ve learned
    Playing with matches a girl can get burned.
    So bring me no ring, groom me no groom,
    Find me no find, catch me no catch.
    Unless he’s a matchless match!
    o “Matchmaker”, Fiddler on the Roof (1964). These lyrics appear at the end of the song, countering the protagonists original (uninformed) plea that the matchmaker “find me a find, catch me a catch”.

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